Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Macro View of Google, Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo

This is a handy chart to see how the Big 3 (and Yahoo) face off. I thought this was particularly interesting before tomorrows big launch.

There's no doubt that Apple will be unveiling big changes for their mobile range (top 6 rows on the chart) between the iPhone OS and the anticipated tablet.

I don't think it is any coincidence that Apple is pushing hardest where Yahoo is all but non-exisent, Microsoft is weakest, and Google is still spinning their tires trying to get traction.

13 comments:

Anna said...

After reading The Divine Right of Capital by Marjorie Kelly, I have to admit I'm concerned about what may happen to Google when the founders give up majority control, as I read in the news they are planning to do by 2014.

DK said...

Please elaborate. I myself have apprehension about the massive amounts of data that Google harnesses. But I have not heard any discussion about the consequence of the founders giving up major control.

By the way, congrats on the new life! Exciting!

Anna said...

Thanks. :)

The book is about the negative effects of having corporations be required (even to the point of it being legally considered their fiduciary duty) to maximize returns to shareholders. The author basically says that the way this ends up working is that corporations maximize returns to shareholders at the expense of anyone or anything they can... employees, the environment, the local community, etc.

This primarily applies to publicly traded corporations, though. She mentioned or quoted one guy who had started his own company, built it up to become very large, and eventually turned it into a publicly traded company and worked as the CEO. The man said the company changed drastically after that; even though he was the CEO, he wasn't able to keep it on the socially-conscientious route that he had taken before.

I don't remember the details; you'd have to look in the book for that. But it made a fairly deep impression on me. Google's "Don't be evil" motto clearly doesn't accord with everything that *I* think is evil, but they are better off for trying to avoid some of the objectionable behavior of Microsoft; and I have my doubts about whether they would be able to maintain that, if the founders lose majority control.

DK said...

Very stimulating thoughts! Thanks Anna. Great to have those thoughts on the radar.

Anna said...

Oh, and something not particularly on topic, that I thought you might find interesting.

DK said...

Your right. I did find it interesting - when I heard about it on Catholic Radio yesterday. That's right. I listen to Catholic Radio. Daily. :)

Anna said...

I thought you might have seen the news headline yesterday, but I admit it never occurred to me that you might have heard it on Catholic Radio. :)

I don't listen to KBVM all that often myself. I've listened to Dr. Ray's show at 10am, but I'm not usually listening to the radio at 10am these days. Is there anything in particular that you listen to? What do you think of it and what do you get out of it?

DK said...

My commute in the evening is between 5 and 6. I normally catch a couple calls on the "Catholic Answer". I love it. Provides some great stuff to chew on and more often then not I really resonate with the hosts.

Anna said...

I've heard people rave about that show before, although I haven't really listened to it myself. (I'm listening online right now, since I'm on my computer.)

Have you thought at all about becoming Catholic?

Anna said...

Hmm. Not very impressed with their answer to the "Why am I not happy?" question. It didn't seem like what he needed to hear.

Anna said...

Love their answer to the rapture question, though. I read a book that gave that explanation of the destruction of Jerusalem as a prefiguring of the end of the world and it was a great insight for me.

DK said...

I heard both of those two. I thought the question about the guy being sad was very raw. The answer fell flat, but for such a tough question I felt they did a commendable job. If I was in his position I would definitely read those two books, and I hope they would dig a little bit deeper in to the issue.

I often time think I am Catholic.

Anna said...

Yes, it was a raw question, and a difficult one. I wanted them to ask about his relationship with Christ though, whether he sees God as an intimate part of his life instead of just a being out there to believe in. I might have asked him if he reads Scripture every day and whether he sees those verses as just being theology or whether he sees them as God's way of talking to him personally. I'd have encouraged him to bare his soul before God in quiet and direct prayer every day, beyond just the rote prayers that many Catholics do. Because it is from our relationship with God that our joy and our peace stem. And that relationship is something that a lot of Catholics don't really have much of. The council of Vatican II brought us a long, long way in that regards, but there's still a longer way to go in Catholic culture. That relationship is built heavily into our theology, but it doesn't get lived-out very well in much of Catholic life.

Deciding that you're Catholic is like deciding that you're married. It's not something that you can decide by yourself. Being Catholic is about being in a sacramental relationship with everyone else in the Church, as being married is about being in a sacramental relationship with your spouse. That's why, to BE Catholic, you have to formally join the Catholic community - as, in getting married, you have to formally join with your spouse. I don't mean the wedding has to be particularly formal... but I mean that there has to be an intentional exchange of vows. Likewise, joining the Catholic community could possibly be a low-key event, but there has to be both an intentional joining on the part of the incomer and also an intentional reception on the part of the community. Does that make sense?