Friday, December 19, 2014

How and Why I Review Bathrooms

This is the first draft of my thoughts on the project, so bear with me:


"The first thing I do is check to see if the bathroom is clean. If it's not clean, then it indicates that they're not paying attention." - Chef Michael Merida

I heard this quote a few months ago and it left a strong impression on me. For as long as I can remember I have always wondered why businesses let their bathrooms detoriate are to such a sad state. I would thing "if I owned a business, I would be so proud that I would pay attention to the details like the bathroom". I would be embarrassed if someone set foot in my bathroom and they had a strong repulsion.

I realized leaving pictures of a business in yelp reviews could be very compelling motivation for business owners to pay attention

I stuck with a 5 star rating in my picutre comments to be consistent with yelps own rating systems.

If you are reading this I'm sure you are curious about how I define my ranking system

After much thought and discussion I decided any business should be able to achieve a 5 start rating. I don't expect a fast food joint to have a bathroom attendant. This means the expectation are  relative to the type of establishment.

Any business can and should be clean to the point that I can tell a deep clean has been done more than once a year.

I don't want to see dust clogging the ceiling vent. I don't want to see mold or mildew in corners or along the baseboards. I don't want to see holes or random screws sticking out of the wall from previous installations.

I do want to see good lighting, a garbage can that is appropriately sized and emptied frequently as appropriate for the businesses traffic, a comfortable layout, functional hardware.

1 - I probably turned around and walked out
2 - out of toilet paper, soap, towels, malfunctioning hardware. Appears only daily effort is emptying trash.
3 - Fully functional and appears to be cleaned daily. Has a deep clean ever been done?
4 - attention to detail, space is well put together. Appears deep clean is done on a reasonably frequent schedule
5 - I would be willing to eat a meal in here!

Sunday, November 02, 2014

Running Buddy Sync

Running for many is a social event. 

My wife and I have been running together a couple times a week for the last 5 years. When we got our first iPhone, Nike+ Running was one of the first apps we downloaded. We have used it on almost every run since.

Nike understands the social element of running, integrating many features that encourage and inspire you. But these feature all connect you to people who you are not physically running with.

What about the people you are running with in person? Each runner need not carry their own device to log the data.

I propose a "Running Buddy Sync" feature that allows you to pair your account with any of your friends. After a run has completed, during the post-run data collection sheet (how you felt, type of run, running pace map...) you are also presented an option to add any Running Buddies. Once selected the run data will be pushed to each of their respective Nike+ accounts automatically.

This would make the Nike+ platform more sticky because runners would be incentivized to promote the app to their friends. And at least in my case it would be the difference between having 1 Nike+ account that we share to log our workouts together, and 2 active accounts.

I have been pondering this feature for the last 6 months, but I feel it is evening more pressing with the advent of comprehensive health tracking in iOS8. I have enjoyed the ease with which I'm able to get a high level overview of my fitness and sleep patterns.

It's increasingly frustrating when there is useful data being collected but isn't being used to it's fullest potential.





Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Reading PDFs on iPhone: Kindle vs iBooks

Over the years I've found myself reading more on the iPhone. This is driven by excellent free access to classic literature ebooks through Project Gutenberg


After going back to school in 2012 I realized there is a treasure trove of free academic material in large PDF's that I would never read in front a traditional PC screen. With my new digital reading patterns I began craving to read these on my iPhone. But the legacy 8.5 x 11 formatting of PDF's does not lend itself to readability on a 3.5" screen. The text is far to small, requiring constant zooming and scrolling.

This is a show stopper for longer documents.

Placing the device in landscape, combined with double tap to zoom offers a glimmer of hope. But as always, the devil is in the details.

Here's a standard PDF starting in landscape mode:



My digital reading habit began in the Kindle app on iOS devices before iBooks was released. Never having any reason to switch, I've stuck with the Kindle app.

In the Kindle app, double tapping anywhere on the text (or anywhere on the document for that matter) will zoom in only on the document itself (margin included):



On a 3.5" screen, this text is still unmanageable for extended reading; requiring constant finger pecking.

In iBooks, a double tap on text will zoom in past the margin, to the edge of the text that was tapped. It also subtly locks vertical scrolling, as if the zoomed state was the original size of the document.


This detail is a habit breaker. iBooks has become my new default reading app.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Passage To India

Lo, soul, seest thou not God's purpose from the first?
The earth to be spann'd, connected by network,
The races, neighbors, to marry and be given in marriage,
The oceans to be cross'd, the distant brought near,
The lands to be welded together.

- Walt Whitman (Passage to India)
Could he even fathom...?

Sunday, March 17, 2013

Clever Use of Space by Mailbox

 Clever ideas seem obvious in retrospect.

For example, first look at a screenshot from Apples native Mail app. In this screenshot on my iPhone 4S I just refreshed the inbox:

Note the space held by the persistent status bar in the bottom, the temporary space held by the loading icon below "All Inboxes", and the doubly redundant loading icon in the status bar.

Now contrast that with Mailbox on the right, in the same state of refreshing the inbox:



Active feedback is provided consistently at one location in the status bar, conserving precious real estate, while still displaying the standard status bar information when in it's neutral state.

Personally, I also found that Mailbox's less intrusive status indicators invited me to continue interacting with my inbox, regardless of what state it is in. I never thought of clicking an item or writing a message in Apples Mail app while it is loading. Instead I find myself staring at the loading indicator waiting for it to finish before proceeding with my business.